Dog Care

DOG CARE > Human Food Could Kill Your Dog

DOG CARE > Human Food Could Kill Your Dog

Let’s face it—dogs are not known for being fussy eaters.  Some dogs will eat anything and everything they can get into their mouth.  This isn’t a big problem with many human foods, but there are a few that could be potentially fatal to your dog.

We are all aware that many dogs cannot eat chocolate.  While a tiny bite here and there may not hurt most dogs, it could kill others (even if your dog eats any chocolate its best to get medical advise).  Dark chocolate and baking chocolate are especially hazardous.

 Onions are another no-no for your dog.  There are chemicals in onions that turn to poison within the dog’s digestive system.  This is true of some strains of mushrooms as well.  Rather than take the chance, it is important to keep both these substances out of your dog’s reach. Garlic is another culprit.  The toxic effect of this spice is quick.

Any kind of seeds could cause problems in your dog.  While most will only cause discomfort and possible vomiting, seeds such as apple seeds can be fatal.  If you have a dog that likes to investigate the garbage, it is important to make sure he can’t get to these.

Chicken bones are another hazard to dogs, as are those of turkey and duck.  These bones tend to shatter and the sharp pieces can poke a hole in your dog’s stomach or intestine.

Dogs are known for eating many things a human stomach cannot handle.  This, however, does not mean they can eat all a human can.  To be safe, make sure foods are not left where your dog can discover them.  The most innocent looking item could be the one that kills your dog. A few minutes of caution can save a lifetime of sadness should you lose your dog.

 

Other foods include:

CHIVES, MACADAMIA NUTS, CORN ON THE COB, AVOCADO, ALCOHOL, GRAPES, RAISINS & ARTIFICIAL SWEETENER - XYLITOL (watch out for peanut butter)

New Dog > Shopping list

New Dog > Shopping list

Your Essential Doggy Shopping List

  • Food
  • Food Bowl
  • Water Bowl
  • Basket/Bed
  • Brush & Comb
  • Disc/tag
  • Indoor kennel
  • Food Mat
  • Bedding
  • Collar and Lead
  • Worm and Flea preparations
  • Book on dog care
  • Toys and treats
  • Poop scoop bags
Dog Health > First aid kit

Dog Health > First aid kit

Doggie First Aid Kit

As a dog owner, you may find yourself needing to give your dog first aid. Dogs are curious creatures and sometimes get into dangerous situations. When they get into trouble, it will be your job to help.  Many of the problems a dog faces are similar to those of our own. Until you can get your dog to a vet, he will depend on you. Having the supplies you need on hand will really help you to be effective.

Rolls of gauze and tape are handy to slow or stop bleeding and are necessary in your doggie first aid kit. You can also find some great blood-clotting topical products too. Hydrogen peroxide is important for cleaning wounds. An old clean blanket is essential for wrapping a dog in shock. A first aid kit should also include an antihistamine for bee or wasp stings, an antibiotic gel and an eye wash. Also, absorbent cotton, gauze rolls or pads, scissors (preferably with rounded tips), tweezers, a rectal thermometer; syringes (without the needle) for giving oral medications, elastic bandages.


Take time to learn the basics of first aid. Keep your vet's phone number handy in case you need him. If you think your dog may need professional care in the middle of the night or on a weekend, consider calling your vet and advising him. He may have some good advice or instructions to help you reach him.  Many cities now have pet emergency centers.  It is advisable to keep their number in your first aid kit as well.

Keep in mind that an injured dog is scared and may bite.  If you feel this is possible, a muzzle is another addition to your kit.  Avoid giving your dog Tylenol.  Ask your vet before it is necessary what kind of pain medication is okay and keep some of that with the rest.

Getting a Dog

Getting a Dog

With 188 pedigree breeds recognised by the Kennel Club as well as a large variety of crossbreeds, there are plenty to choose from. Dogs come in all shapes and sizes from the biggest – the Great Dane – to the smallest – the Chihuahua – and each breed has different needs and requirements.

Before you commit to buying a puppy, it is a good idea to do some research into the type of dog that will and won’t fit you and your lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Things to Consider:

  • Would I prefer a pedigree puppy or a crossbreed?
  • Is this breed compatible with my lifestyle?
  • What size will the dog become when it reaches full adulthood, and is my home and garden suitable?
  • Can I afford the cost of feeding and healthcare?
  • Do I have the time for the exercise my dog will require?
  • How much time do I want to spend grooming my dog? (Some breeds require grooming for an hour or more per day)

 

Housing

Choosing a suitable bed or basket for your dog is very important, as this is the place where he or she should feel safe and secure. We stock a range of dog beds including waterproof, hard-wearing, plastic, wicker, washable and fleecy beds. Come and look around our shop for some inspiration!


 

Feeding

Here at PAWS we stock frozen dog food and we also cater for dogs with specialist dietary needs. We can supply food for overweight dogs, elderly dogs, dogs following a vegetarian diet or with particular sensitivities and dogs following a hypoallegentic diet. Dog food is available for all different growth stages.A good diet for a dog should be made from high quality natural ingredients with plenty of meat and no artificial additives. Ideally it should have active ingredients such as prebiotics and nucleotides to provide extra support for long-term health and well-being. There are a number of feeding regimes to choose from when considering your dog’s diet: dry complete diets, semi-moist or tinned food with or without biscuit mixer and home-made food. Not all dogs eat the amount recommended by the food manufacturers.

The right amount should produce firm, dark brown, crinkly stools. Most dogs appreciate being fed twice a day, but it is fine to feed once a day if that suits you and your dog’s lifestyle better.

 

Feeding Tips

  • Any change in diet should be made very gradually over at least a week to avoid upset and you should try a new diet for at least 10 days before making any further changes.
  • Fresh water should be available to your dog at all times.
  • Never feed your dog from the table or your plate, as this encourages drooling and attention-seeking behaviour such as begging and barking.

 

Socialisation and training

It is essential to train your dog. A well-trained dog is a happy dog, able to deal with new people and situations and less likely to exhibit problem behaviour. As such, it pays to spend time getting things right from the outset. Key commands to teach your dog are ‘Sit’ ‘Come’ and Stay’.

 

Training Tips

  • Use high quality training treats.
  • Short regular training lessons are best.
  • As dogs don’t speak English, they learn to associate sounds with actions.
  • If your dog seems to be confused, try going back a stage in your training process.
  • Link the command only when the dog has perfected the action.
  • Remember that all dogs learn at different rates.

 

Toys

The role of a dog toy is closely linked to the dog’s inbuilt nature. A toy, when hidden under a blanket or around the house, encourages the dog’s natural instinct for foraging and exploration. Retrieving games provide excellent exercise opportunities, while tug of war games permit the dog to practice protecting and holding. Some toys, designed to be played with by the dog alone, allow the practice of manipulation and chewing, which helps to maintain healthy teeth and gums. An occupied dog won’t become bored, and is less likely to develop uncontrollable or bad behaviour.

 

 

Exercise

Your dog requires daily exercise. How much exercise your dog needs will depend very much on its type of breed. Remember that when walking your dog in public areas, it should always be kept on a lead. You must always be vigilant about cleaning up your dog’s mess in order to abide by the law, and not doing so carries heavy fines. We stock poop bags in our shop. It is also law that your dog must wear a collar with a tag or disc which bears owner’s name and address. At PAWS we offer a specialist fitting service for dog’s coats, harnesses and collars.

 

Grooming

Grooming is essential, especially for long-haired dogs. If the hair is left unbrushed for a period of time, it will twist and matt together, causing the dog discomfort. Regular grooming of short-haired dogs is also important, as loose hairs can irritate the skin. Your dog may require the odd bath, and will need its nails clipping on a frequent basis.

 

 

Worming, Flea Control & Vaccinations

Keep your dog healthy by giving it regular treatments for fleas and other skin parasites. You should also worm your dog every 3 months to treat roundworm and tapeworm. Your vet will be able to provide the necessary vaccinations for your dog, while PAWS stocks worming and flea treatments.

 

 

Your Essential Doggy Shopping List

  • Food
  • Food Bowl
  • Water Bowl
  • Basket/Bed
  • Brush & Comb
  • Disc/tag
  • Indoor kennel
  • Food Mat
  • Bedding
  • Collar and Lead
  • Worm and Flea preparations
  • Book on dog care
  • Toys and treats
  • Poop scoop bags
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DOG HEALTH > Your Dog’s Ear Infection

DOG HEALTH > Your Dog’s Ear Infection

Dogs are prone to ear infections because of the anatomy of their ears. They have a horizontal and a vertical component to them, so it is hard for anything in to drain out.

Signs of an ear infection include excessive head shaking, yellow to brown oozing in the ears, or a yeast-like smell. Additional signs of ear infections include redness and swelling.

There are several causes of ear infections. The most common cause of ear infections are due to allergies. Some dogs are more prone to allergies than others; therefore they get more ear infections.

If your dog does have an ear infection it is important to properly clean your dog's ears before applying any medication.

To clean your dog's ears, start by placing a few drops of an ear cleanser into the ear and massage the ear to help loosen any debris that is in there. Then use a cloth or cotton gauze to wipe the dirt out.

After your dog's ears are thoroughly clean, you can then apply your medication. Follow your veterinarian's advice about how much medication to apply to the ear, usually a few drops.

The treatment your veterinarian will prescribe will vary depending on the cause of the ear infection. For yeast infections, they might prescribe anti-fungal medication. For bacterial infections they will probably prescribe antibiotics. Normally, treatment is applied directly into the ears, but in severe cases systemic treatment may be needed. This usually means having to give your dog pills orally. .

Some breeds of dogs that are prone to ear infections include breeds with large ears that flap over the ear canal, and breeds of dogs that have a very small canal. These dogs need their ears checked often.

By knowing what to look for, you can detect ear infections early.